Tag Archives: Lua

Lua Revisited

Back in the dark ages when the ESP8266 was something new, I had a go at the nodeMCU software, essentially implementing the Lua language (or a subset of it) on the ESP8266.  At the time I was not familiar with Lua but thanks to some of the excellent resources out there on the web, I quickly caught up.

Sadly, my expectations exceeded the ability of the implementation to match and every time I went past flashing a few lights – CRASH. I gave up in disgust.  I’m not complaining as that gave me the impetus to learn the hard way how best to program these chips – which I maintain is using the C language – and in my case via the unofficial development kit which is just an excellent piece of work by Mikhail Grivorev, leading to a complete Windows environment with a ton of examples. Between that and TuanPMs excellent MQTT code as a starting point  I’ve been happily programming away and even built up a working relationship with Espressif in the process. My home control project is well under way and now just waiting for some new boards – and a function that Espressif have promised to shut down PWM.

LuaMeanwhile this morning, I can’t remember what I was reading that triggered me off, I decided to have a quick look at the node-MCU code again.  I had it sitting in the development environment but figured it would be out of date and so went off to the repository to study any changes – which I duly put into the code. The GIT Makefile is useless for Windows but fortunately there was one in the environment – and as it happens, a good one. I wasn’t about to go backward so I made sure I was linking to the very latest SDK which at this time is 1.1.2 with at least one patch – all available from the Espressif forum.

I checked the settings in the Makefile, adjusted the SPI speed up to 80Mhz, set the FLASH size to 4Mb to suit the sparkly new ESP-210 that is sitting here looking for a job – and started the compile process. Within a minute and without any issues, the code was flashed. I have to say I was expecting at least one or two issues – but no.

I set up a 9600 baud terminal, in the process discovering for the first time that you can have multiple terminals at once in the Eclipse environment – handy (it would be more handy if it always reported the right location of bugs but you can’t have everything). Sure enough – a working Lua board.

I told it about my WIFI setup and sure enough it grabbed that too.  The project has come a long way since the early days and now (apparently) supports json, a file system, timers, pwm, i2c, spi, 1-wire, net, mqtt, coap, gpiio, wifi, adc, uart and more. I’ll believe all of that when I see it.

I was delighted to see that both the integer and float versions are available – that’s a plus! I also noted support for the WS2812b chips – I noted that as I had to make a change to the source code and I’m delighted to note that they’ve made use of a local compiler directive that I was not even aware of to ensure accurate timing. Wish I’d seen that a month ago when I started work on my own WS2812b support. 

WS2812B LEDs on nodeMCU LuaI plugged a (short) length of WS2812b strip (a custom board we had made) into the ESP-210, fired the instruction and… worked first time out of the box. Impressive.

I’m pleased to see the nodeMCU docs have come on a long way – sadly the website was running like a DOG at the time but here’s a few stats I managed to get off the board.

print(node.heap()) returned 20kbytes which is more than when I tried it – but then it used to die when the heap got down to 5K so we’ll have to wait and see how reliable that is.

3 Channels of PWM are available – at 10 bit resolution. Clearly some work to be done here as Espressif have just released a library handling more outputs than that at nearer to 14 bit resolution – and it works as I’ve been using it in my own research and projects. However – handy enough.

There are libraries for sending to displays complete with fonts – now that I’m interested in – if this will do reliably MQTT and report results to a display I have a use for this already – wall thermostats.

So, overall, a very brief test – it is possible with the right environment to get interactive and easy to use nodeMCU up and running in minutes – you don’t need special boards and the software is free. Can’t be bad – how complex a program you can make withou running out of RAM remains to be seen. Here is some more info on nodeMCU.

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