Category Archives: home control

ESP8266 Code Update

The code that forms a series of articles on this blog has now not been updated for some time – simply because it “just works” and has been doing so reliably for many months. However, I’ve been wanting to add bits to it and my problem was I was running dangerously low on iRAM. This would not affect the stack or reliability but would just stop me from continuously adding code.

Well, thanks to Espressif that is now history. The latest Esp8266 SDK, released just days ago, fixes a number of things on the ESP8266 – you can find the SDK here – you will need it if you wish to compile code but of course ROMS are available as usual.  The upshot for me is the return of nearly 800 bytes of iRAM which is something of a breath of fresh air.

Continue reading ESP8266 Code Update

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

The Light Fantastic

CY-30 Light SensorThis morning, a long-forgotten package turned up for me – a cheap but accurate light level sensor from China – claimed to be around 1 lux accuracy and giving a direct output in lux. A small board is available here in Britain for around £4 or the identical board from China for 98 pence. I chose the latter. It is called the GY-30 board.

The tiny board comes complete with connector which takes seconds to solder on (I put mine on the underside). There is an address line which does not need connecting and the I2c has pull-up resistors already in place so basically you provide ground, 3v3 and I2c.

I plugged this into one of our ESP826 boards and did the I2c search – it came back with device 35 (0x23).

The documentation has various modes but unless you are power saving (in which case the ESP8266 might not be your best call) you can just leave the thing on converting at high resolution 0-65k. I wrote two functions – one to initialise the I2c and to start the conversion off – the other function to read back the 16 bit value from the device.

tmpC1DBAt maximum resolution, you have to leave around 180ms between readings and of course it won’t start the next check until you read it so the best thing to do is just grab the readings maybe every few seconds depending on your application (once every 15 minutes would do me) and store it away somewhere.

Anyway I’ve added the code to the house control code – boards suitably updated (v1.6.50 or higher) can issue {gy30_init:35} and {gy30_read:35} commands. If you cover the sensor with your hand you will typically get a value of 4 or less. Ambient light in my office produces around 80-100 and pointing the unit up to the lights produces a reading of around 1000. Don’t ask me to do a sunlight test – wrong time of the year here in the frozen wastes of the Northeast of England.

I do plan to stick one in the window and log it – so when I’m off in Spain and people back here are saying “oh, it’s lovely and bright here” I can tell if they are telling fibs. Check out the blog entries on home control 2016, flashing the code for more info.

Enjoy.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

HC 2016 Experiments

Throughout the development of the Home Control 2016 project I’ve constantly had the software tied a via a serial umbilical to my PC to monitor passing messages, make sure all is well etc. and to periodically check on RAM space to make sure nothing I’m doing is running away with precious memory.

You may have seen elsewhere that I’ve been working with a prototyping board which is basically an ESP12 with a prototyping area in which I’ve put rows of pins for ground, 3v3, 5v and the two lines I use for I2c as I add various peripherals culminating in the recent idea to use an Arduino 328 chip as an “ultimate peripheral”.

Well, we’ve taken that one a stage further and we’ve been discussing making our own prototyping board (Aidan’s a whizz at PCBs and of course we use the likes of Dirty PCBs in China so it is quite cheap to knock up a few boards) and the last few days I’ve been formulating a planas Aidan puts together the schematic. What I’ve realised is that I always run out of the power and ground lines no matter what I do. Add to that the FTDI so I can monitor serial Comms and it all gets a bit messy.

Display for HC2016

So right now we’ve been discussing a board with the ESP-12 module with lots of pins and additionally a 328 SMT chip with Xtal. Of course that means 2 serial monitors. I’ve been playing with the old QDTech 128*160 displays since I discovered that they work pretty well when driven from the proper SPI pins on Arduinos (don’t even think of using software SPI on them) and ramping up the SPI speed – and so it was that in conversation, we were saying “if only you could scroll them” – that led to thoughts of having a RAM buffer larger than the total available on the ESP8266 or Arduino and… well, I thought I’d use our friend Google to go take a look. It turns out – I was completely unaware of this and VERY pleasantly surprised to find – that the QDTECH chip has the ability to scroll up built in – all that is needed is to scroll up an area then paint a fast horizontal black line after each scroll. 

There is a version of the driver for the board here and at some point in 2014, it turns out that an M J Sage added this scrolling ability. Well done.  I wonder if he or she realised what a useful addition this could be.

So now we have a display, easily driven by the 328 which can scroll constantly (I’ve had it on several night’s test) and hence provide a boatload of status info. Top and bottom can if needed remain static.

First Stab

We’re going to incorporate the display onto the prototyping board and it won’t take any additional space as it will sit neatly over the other components! The image above probably bears no relation to the final board but I’m just trying to convey an idea here. The prototyping area on the right of the board will be chock-full of PTH holes but there will be long runs of connected holes for power and I2c as these end up being needed the most with connector wires. All 0.1” of course.

With the QDTech display you can connect the reset line to the 328 reset and hence here are my first thoughts at the use of the 328 which will have access to A6 and A7. I’ve pretty much got this working – just need to add in the temperature handling code I already have for Dallas and DHT chips.

D0-7 – general purpose port extender – inputs or outputs or any mix
D8     D/C for QDTECH
D9     16- BIT PWM out
D10  16-BIT PWM out
D11   MOSI for QDTECH
D12   MISO
D13   SCLK for QDTECH
A0      CS for QDTECH
A1      Temperature
A2      Temperature
A3       Debounced input
A4      I2C to ESP
A5      I2C to ESP
A6      Analog in 1
A7      Analog in 2

Aside from losing GPIO2 and GPIO14 inputs (as they’ll run the I2c) the ESP use will remain the same.  The only restriction being that we cannot run ESP PWM at the same time as the I2c due to timing interference– a pain but not something I can see away around. The I2c 16-channel PWM controller does seem a good way around this as it offloads all PWM work onto a cheap board – for single colour PWM lighting the new 16-bit PWM on the 328 works fabulously.

Given that the 328 can handle inputs for the main board we can do away with our normal GPIO2 and GPIO14 and they can have the job of I2c, leaving all normal outputs as for the existing system.

I guess the end-game here will be the smallest possible board that contains both the 328 and the ESP wired to this spec for general use. But that comes later after we see how well all of this works in practice. First the prototyping board. Watch this space.

Sadly in the link I’ve enclosed, the author refers to Banggood who used indeed to offer these displays for under £3 at a time when there were no software drivers for them – (I think we paid £2.60) but I’ve noticed recently that Banggood have been getting greedy and jacking their prices up – a cursory check of the link shows they now want £5.48 for these simple LCD displays – well good luck with that Banggood.

The only ones I’ve found up to now – and the price is good – as usual – is AliExpress.

Someone have another link?  the board has an 8-way connector at one end and a larger connector at the other – with a full size SD socket on the underside. See the AliExpress link.

This blog entry could well change dramatically as we spot fatal flaws in the plan above Smile

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Midweek Ramblings

Following my addition of the BME280 code to Home Control 2016, a couple of guys have suggested they might like to see more accuracy than the integer I use for temperature so I’ve added a new polled value {hightemperature} which is simply the temperature value *10 – but with that extra accuracy – so for example hightemperature mod 10 would give you the decimal point. Not sure I see a need for even higher precision so we’ll leave it at that – personally I just use temperature to the nearest degree.

hightemperature[7]

I’m also playing as you know with port expanders and having already ran out of ports I’ve added an experimental additional 8 port outputs via one of those cheap port expanders I referred to in a previous blog entry.  So assuming this is set to address 38 (typically that’s switch 3 set to off, the others set to on) you can do simply control of out17 to 24, bearing in mind these things start off as inputs floating high.

Port expander

I’ve not attempted at this point to store values in FLASH or preset them on power up – let’s see how much use this gets.

See the Home Control 2016 manual for updates.

On a different tack, this might seem obvious to the hardware guys here and it should have been obvious to me as I’ve been working with electronic hardware since I was old enough to think -  but I made the mistake of getting lazy recently – on my new pergola. I set up on of our boards with a cheap Chinese relay board on GPIO12 – to control a water mister (it gets hot here).  So I would use the timed outputs for example {out12:6,2] which sets output 12 on for 2 minutes before timing out back to OFF state.

I had the water fittings all set to go, got my Imperihome App out, pressed the button and sure enough – excellent misting. I pressed the button to turn the mist off and…. nothing.

I figured a jammed relay – but no. Out of desperation I checked the actual state of the port as set in memory – and it said the output was on – but I’d turned it off – this was impossible. I sat and went through the code over and over – no issues.

I made the classic mistake of assuming the hardware was perfect and it had to be a software issue. In FACT, even though the misting system was kind of isolated from the board by the little external relay board, said relay was powering a 12v washing machine coil – and as it turns out the backlash from the coil was having the weirdest effect on the board – stopping that port turning off – to this day I still can’t explain it as it was actually affecting storage of info in the chip.  I can only assume a voltage spike getting back to the board itself.

1n4001

I know, sounds daft, so I put a diode across the washing machine solenoid – something I should have done in the first place. Immediately – 100% perfect operation tested over and over. Worth knowing about. See purple diode below.

diode to stop interference

Also added {reset_config} command so that from serial you can reset the board to defaults  - for security this will not work from MQTT.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

More Home Control 2016 Updates

As of version 1.5.61 of the Home Control 2016 code,  I’ve now expanded the {debug} command considerably, added new Hitachi display commands and introduced a new MQTT topic called “otacomplete”. Here incidentally is the Bitbucket repository for all of this.

The Hitachi commands are documented in the manual.  As for the new MQTT topic, this is so that, should you choose to OTA update a unit remotely, you have some means to know asap that it is working.  In the event of an OTA update, the unit will send out the following MQTT message:

topic : otacomplete
payload: [the ID of the unit]

Typical serial on-demand debug output at the time of writing – for a test unit with ID “freddy” - with passwords changed to protect the innocent:

Time: 09:07:05 11/08/2016
Time Code: 1470906425
Dusk: 21:08 Dawn: 07:22
On1: 08:00 Off1: 12:00 On2: 15:00 Off2: 23:00 Peak: 23c Off-peak: 19c Frost: 14c
IP: 192:168:1:25
Internal ID: ARPS_00A68508
ID: freddy
DESC: empty
FLAGS: 
SSID: wififorus (Active)  Pass: xxxxxxxx
SSID2: wififorus  Pass2: xxxxxxxxx
MQTT Host: 192.168.1.19 Port: 1883 User: admin
OTA Host: www.scargill.net  Port: 80
Code Version: 1.5.61
SDK Version: 2.0.0(656edbf)
RSSI: -48
Out0: 0
Out4: 0
Out5: 1
Out12: 0
Out15: 0
Out16: 0
Sensor Type: DHT22
Temperature Port: GPIO2
GPIO13 available for general use: No
GPIO2 is an input
Sonoff setting=0
WiFi button=2
Invert settings=HEX( 1)
Serial2 settings=0
RGB Indicator=1
Electrodragon=0
No LED clock
CPU frequency: 80Mhz
Free Heap: 16680 bytes
Up Time: 0:05:04

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Home Control Updates

For those following the home control project including the ROMS for ESP8266, I’ve made several changes in the last few days including a new uptime command {uptime?} returning a string of the time since last reset/power-cycle. Also added that to the debug output – also fixed a couple of minor RGB issues. Source code now works with very latest SDK 1.5.4.1 from Espressif http://bbs.espressif.com/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=2376

If none of this means anything to you see:

https://tech.scargill.net/blowing-the-home-control-2016-code/

https://tech.scargill.net/home-control-2016/

https://tech.scargill.net/nextion-wifi-touch-display/

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

New PCB

After a slight hiccup with the new board (LED track missing) here’s the new board  – link for PCB here – as you can see, Aidan has made several improvements – smaller buttons, connector for DHT22 etc, markings for I2c (right now I only have support for the 8-output expander discussed elsewhere but more will follow as time permits) and general tidy up. Both the original LED and the new RGB LED are included – personally I find coloured lights for status a lot more useful than a flashing light – but of course they can use more power. As well as the LCD project this board has become a general purpose ESP-12 board and I now would not use any other.  We’ve not wasted cost putting USB on it because FTDIs are cheap and that reduces the end cost of the board.   The link above has all the files – please note we’ve NOT had delivery of these, the previous version was almost the same and works but for a track on the WS2812b.. so it is highly likely this board will be just fine – will be a couple of weeks or so before we know (delivery from China) and another week before I get my hands on one (Aidan is in the UK, I’m in Spain). The I2C markings are just to make it easier to remember which pins you use – we didn’t have enough room for yet another 4-way connector. If you are looking in for the first time – see the Nextion WIFI Display blog and the Home Control 2016 blog.

I’ll be trying this out on a brand new Nextion board I just received (faster processor I think – not tested yet – will blog when I do) along with some other stuff from Itead

Enjoy. For my next trick – a new board from SEEED…. review coming up later.

 

PCB

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Raspberry Pi 2 Fast Enough?

The Raspberry Pi is a nice, cheap little computer but for me it has never been fast enough – I’m not interested in making another media server (I have a DISKSTATION which does that just fine) but as I’ve recently been working with MQTT in my home control setup, I did think it would be nice to have an MQTT broker and some ability to send commands to it in one little reliable box. 

Repeated messages out there indicate that the Raspberry Pi is pushing it’s luck to do all of that at high speed as it approaches the limits of speed (and possibly even memory).

What I’ve been looking for is the same thing with much more memory and much more speed. Well, how does (claimed) 6* more speed and twice the memory sound – for the same price?

I’m sure those who have recently purchased the original Raspberry Pi will have a million reasons why it’s not necessary – and I feel sorry for them but now it looks like the Raspberry Pi II (2) at long last has the power I need.

I wonder how long it will take before the price settles to what we would expect – I have NO doubt that early copies will be expensive – that tends to happen in Britain.

And as for Windows 10 – apparently Microsoft will make this available for free – that could be desperation or it could be EXTREMELY good marketing – for those who don’t really want to get into Linux – Windows development + Windows in the embedded code… has to be some mileage there.

More on this when my board turns up!

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin